On Eternal Patrol: Overview PDF Print E-mail

On Eternal Patrol: Overview

Since the acceptance of the first submarine into the U.S. Navy in 1900, over four thousand men have lost their lives in the Silent Service. The great majority of them died in World War II. Following are brief glimpses of a few of those gallant men.

 

Please see our sister site - On Eternal Patrol - for individual memorial pages on each of the over 4,000 men lost while serving in the U.S. Submarine Force.

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Secrets of the Sub

Victory At Cost

Victory at a cost

During World War II, The United States Submarine Force, encompassing less than 2% of the U.S. Navy's fleet, inflicted destruction on Japanese maritime power. U.S. submarines were responsible for sinking over 30% of the Japanese Navy including eight aircraft carriers, one battleship and eleven cruisers.  More importantly, the Submarine Force sank 2,400 Japanese merchant ships totaling 4.9 million tons.

Chart of Enemy Ships

However, this success did not come without risk. Out of a total of 14,000 submariners who fought in peril under the sea took losses of over 3,500 officers and men.  Approximately one in four submariners never returned.

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The USS Bonefish submarine plaque is one of fifty-two memorials at the Waterfront Memorial at Bowfin Park.